apriltaurus



Reblogged from eathealthytrainhard
Reblogged from ex0skeletal

artfulordain:

ex0skeletal:

In case you’re sad here are some buns.

widdle soft softs

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Reblogged from 00706-deactivated20140727

00706:

  • ニシカワパン スライスブール
  • ニシカワパン 丸太ブレッド(メープル)
  • ニシカワパン こしあんパン
  • ニシカワパン シュガークロワッサン 5個入り

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Reblogged from fantasia

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Reblogged from doriimer
Reblogged from doriimer
Reblogged from foodescapades

(Source: foodescapades, via yummyheaven)

Reblogged from amnhnyc
amnhnyc:

Trapdoor spider  
Observing this spider is a bit like looking back in time. Members of the family Liphistiidae—the group to which this animal belongs—retain details of anatomy that appear in fossils 300 million years old. Getting a look at this living fossil can be a challenge, though. Trapdoor spiders spend most of their time in underground burrows, emerging mainly to grab prey. They grow very slowly; mature male specimens are hard for even experts to find.
Species Range: Eastern Thailand, along the border with Laos and Cambodia
Habitat: Terrestrial; often burrows in the forest floor or on the banks of streams
Should you worry? No. Though it does have venom glands, its rarity and underground lifestyle mean you’re unlikely to meet it—or its venom. 
See this species in person in the exhibition Spiders Alive! open now. 

amnhnyc:

Trapdoor spider  

Observing this spider is a bit like looking back in time. Members of the family Liphistiidae—the group to which this animal belongs—retain details of anatomy that appear in fossils 300 million years old. Getting a look at this living fossil can be a challenge, though. Trapdoor spiders spend most of their time in underground burrows, emerging mainly to grab prey. They grow very slowly; mature male specimens are hard for even experts to find.

Species Range: Eastern Thailand, along the border with Laos and Cambodia

Habitat: Terrestrial; often burrows in the forest floor or on the banks of streams

Should you worry? No. Though it does have venom glands, its rarity and underground lifestyle mean you’re unlikely to meet it—or its venom. 

See this species in person in the exhibition Spiders Alive! open now. 

Reblogged from amnhnyc
amnhnyc:

This weekend at the Museum: sharks, spiders, and pterosaurs! Oh, my! Whether you consider these creatures frightful or fantastic, you can learn all about them at the Museum right now. 
Here are our favorite posts from the past week:
Don’t worry if you missed the Museum’s #WhaleWash, we posted the footage!
A study led by indigenous people uncovered a grizzly bear ‘highway.’
A diagram that shows our cosmic address at a glance.
Often mistaken for a dinosaur, Dimetrodon was one of the earliest relatives of mammals.
How trapdoor spiders got their name.
A peek into the archives shows the arrival of the Willamette Meteorite to the Museum in 1906!
Have a great weekend!

amnhnyc:

This weekend at the Museum: sharks, spiders, and pterosaurs! Oh, my! Whether you consider these creatures frightful or fantastic, you can learn all about them at the Museum right now

Here are our favorite posts from the past week:

Have a great weekend!

Reblogged from amnhnyc
amnhnyc:

#FossilFriday returns with mene rhombeus, also known as a “moonfish.” This beautiful, deep-bodied fossil may be related to modern carangids, which first appeared in the Eocene, along with many other reef fishes that have survived to the present. Collected in Italy, this mene rhombeus fish lived 40 million years ago. 
You can find this and a whole collection of beautiful fossil fishes in the Museum’s Hall of Vertebrate Origins. 

amnhnyc:

#FossilFriday returns with mene rhombeus, also known as a “moonfish.” This beautiful, deep-bodied fossil may be related to modern carangids, which first appeared in the Eocene, along with many other reef fishes that have survived to the present. Collected in Italy, this mene rhombeus fish lived 40 million years ago. 

You can find this and a whole collection of beautiful fossil fishes in the Museum’s Hall of Vertebrate Origins